Kategoriarkiv: Kretslopp

The Future in Sanitation is off the grid!

How much water do each of us use every day? Can future sanitation systems and off-the-grid houses be designed so as to minimize energy and water consumption? Where does wastewater management fit into the waste hierarchy/pyramid? In his presentation, Björn Vinnerås, Associate Professor at SLU shares with us his vision of future housing: a future where there is ‘no need for network connections, neither electricity nor water, and nor wastewater’.

Click here to access the presentation.Post published by Prithvi Simha

Lessons learnt towards sustainable resource loops, and remaining challenges

On 25th October, the kretsloppsteknik research group hosted a farewell symposium in honor of Professor Håkan Jönsson. At SLU, Prof. Jönsson has been leading research and education on the topic of nutrient recycling from wastewater and food waste since 1993, when the topic was first introduced at the department of energy and technology. It was under his lead, the research group kretsloppsteknik (environmental engineering) was established.

In his farewell presentation Prof. Jönsson explored many topics such as composting, source-separation of wastewater, urine diversion and recycling, systems analysis and environmental impact assessment of urine diversion, etc. Click here to access the presentation which recaps the work, research and contributions of Prof. Jönsson to various subject areas over the years.

Prof. Jönsson closed the symposium with further remarks and a vote of thanksPost published by Prithvi Simha

 

Source separation: the future for efficient resource recovery

What is ‘New Sanitation’ according to Professor Grietje Zeeman from Wageningen University in the Netherlands? How has the practical experience been so far with the upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor for blackwater treatment and bio-flocculation of greywater? Can micropollutants be mitigated through composting of anaerobic sludge? Are heavy metals from wastewater really a problem in agriculture? Interested in learning more about how these technologies have been applied at full scale in Sneek, Venlo, Wageningen and The Hague? Click here to access Professor Zeeman’s presentation.Post published by Prithvi Simha

Sustainable technologies to meet the future needs for sanitation

Is it possible to reduce the water footprint of a city to 1/10th of its current value without sacrificing any comfort? What does circular economy mean for sanitation systems? How important is phosphorous for food production? How can source separation systems improve nutrient cycling in the environment? Can we produce biodiesel from algae grown in urine? Professor Petter Jenssen from the Norwegian University of Life Sciences explores these questions and many more in his presentation which can be accessed herePost published by Prithvi Simha

Improving wastewater treatment plants for increased nutrient recovery

Dr. David Gustavsson, Research Leader at Sweden Water Research loves centralized wastewater treatment plants! He starts his presentation saying…“I really love these plants”. At a symposium filled with people discussing the possibility of taking sanitation off the grid, that’s quite a statement to make. Jokingly, he further comments, “....should I leave now?”. How good are centralized WWTPs in removing unwanted substances? In nutrient removal and recovery? Is there a case to be made for the co-existence or indeed, the integration of urine diversion with the operation of such plants? How will WWTP operations be affected with increased urine diversion at source?

Click here to access Dr. Gustavsson’s presentation to find out more and let us know what you think!Post published by Prithvi Simha

Hur fås högsta värdet ur biologiskt nedbrytbart avfall?

Kommuner förväntas tillgodose sina invånare med avfallshantering, vilket finansieras med skatteintäkter och/eller avfallshanteringsavgifter. I många låg-, och medel-inkomstländer kämpar kommunerna med att tillgodose en acceptable servicenivå och på dessa ställe sköter den informella sektorn ofta stora delar av insamlingen och behandlingen av avfallet. Till skillnad från plast-, och metallfraktionerna, sköter inte den informella sektorn om det biologiska nedbrytbara fraktionen; främst för värdet är så lågt att behandlingen skulle kosta betydligt mer än de möjliga inkomsterna. Om den biologiskt nedbrytbara fraktionen kunde omvandlas till produkter av högt värde skulle behandlingen kunna bära sin egen kostnad vilket skulle kunna uppmuntra insamlingen och behandlingen av denna fraktion.
I den här studien utvärderade och jämförde vi det potentiella värdet av produkter som erhölls i fyra olika behandlingsstrategier: termofil kompostering (den vanligaste förekommande behandlingen av det biologiskt nedbrytbara fraktionen globalt), fluglarvskompostering, rötning och fluglarvskompostering följt av rötning. Om ni är intresserade av vilken strategi som producerar högst värde, läs vidare här.

Kontakt: Cecilia Lalander

Posted by Prithvi Simha

English version below.

Fortsätt läsa Hur fås högsta värdet ur biologiskt nedbrytbart avfall?

Research shows Biochar is efficient in removing pharmaceutical residues at onsite sewage facilities

In a very recent study published in Science of the Total Environment, Sahar Dalahmeh, a researcher at the Environmental Engineering Unit, and her co-workers investigated the potential of biochar filters to replace or complement sand filters for the removal of pharmaceutical residues from wastewater in onsite sewage facilities.

In particular, their study examined what effects biodegradation, adsorption and a combination of these processes have on the removal of model pharmaceutical substances from wastewater. They used biochar filters operated under hydraulic loading conditions mimicking those found in onsite sand infiltration beds. In a 22-weeks experiment, concentrations and removal carbamazepine, metoprolol, ranitidine and caffeine were investigated in four treatments: biochar with active, biochar with inactive biofilm, biochar without biofilm and sand with active biofilm. They conclude that biochar is a promising filter medium for onsite sewage facilities, especially for persistent pharmaceutical residues such as carbamazepine and metoprolol.

Interested in reading more? Follow the below link to access the full publication:

Dalahmeh, S., Ahrens, L., Gros, M., Wiberg, K., & Pell, M. (2018). Potential of biochar filters for onsite sewage treatment: Adsorption and biological degradation of pharmaceuticals in laboratory filters with active, inactive and no biofilmScience of The Total Environment612, 192-201.

You can read more of Sahar’s work on ResearchGate or get in touch with her at Sahar.Dalahmeh@slu.se

 

Potential of biochar filters for onsite sewage treatment

Posted by Prithvi Simha

Licentiate Seminar: Luis Fernando Perez Mercado

Luis Fernando Perez Mercado, Doctoral Candidate at the Environmental Engineering Unit, Department of Energy and Technology will defend his licentiate thesis entitled, On-farm filtration technology for pathogen reduction: Reuse of low hygienic quality water for vegetable irrigation.

When?: 24 October 2017 at 13:30
Where?: Lecture Room 2034, MVM house, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences

For further information, get in touch with Luis at the Department of Energy and Technology, P.O. Box 7032, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden. E-mail: fernando.perez@slu.se

Abstract:  Reusing wastewater for irrigation has been widely recognized as an effective way to recirculate plant nutrients and water, particularly in arid and semi-arid regions. However, wastewater reuse in agriculture poses several hazards for human health, because of potential introduction of pathogens into agricultural production systems and therefore increasing the disease burden. Risks are higher in developing countries, where conventional wastewater treatment plants face several challenges in adequately treating the wastewater, if at all. In order to feasibly address such risks, a new management approach has been posed in which alternative measures act as barriers along the farm-to-fork pathway. The concept is that a cumulative effect of these barriers reduces exposure to pathogens. The overall aim of this study was to evaluate the hygienic quality of produce from agricultural systems using irrigation water contaminated with wastewater and to assess suitability of an on-farm filtering in this system.

To achieve this objective, the concentration of bacteriophages, E. coli and helminth eggs was measured in lettuce, water and soil during one cropping season in an agricultural system. This agricultural system used wastewater as well as riverbank filtration for irrigation of vegetables in Cochabamba, Bolivia. Five riverbank wells and the associated river were sampled every two weeks during the monitored cropping season. Soil samples were taken from the five plots that were irrigated with the monitored wells when the lettuce was planted and again when harvested. Composite lettuce samples were taken when harvested. In the laboratory, the reduction of bacteriophages (ɸX174 and MS2), E. coli, Enterococcus spp. and Saccharomyces cerevisiae by charcoal filters was investigated in relation to three grain diameter of filtering media. The tested parameters and levels were: two hydraulic loading rates 200 and 400 L m-2 d-1, three grain diameters of the biochar (Ø = 1.4, 2.8 and 5 mm), and two inflowing levels of electric conductivities of 500 and 1000 µS cm-1.

The microbial concentrations found in soil, lettuce and water sources of agricultural system evidenced high probabilities of fecal contamination along the system. Two types of riverbank filtration wells were identified: protected and unprotected. Both types exhibited significant levels (circa 4 log10 E. coli, 2 log10 bacteriophages, 1 log10 protozoa cysts and 70 % helminth eggs) of microbial reduction. Protected wells had significantly higher reduction rates for all microorganisms except virus. Results from biochar filters showed 1 log10 unit removal of all the monitored microorganisms, however, only for the smallest grain diameter (1.4 mm). No difference was found in microbial removal with either tested hydraulic loading rates nor with the tested electric conductivities. Grain diameter and uniformity of filtering media were identified as main factors for microbial removal for the two tested filtration technologies. Full-scale implementation of both is considered extremely context-dependent due to need of specific geological characteristics for riverbank filtration and due to large area requirement for biochar filters.

Posted by Prithvi Simha

Licentiate Seminar: Jenna Senecal

Jenna Senecal, Doctoral Candidate at the Environmental Engineering Unit, Department of Energy and Technology will defend her licentiate thesis entitled, Urea stabilisation and dehydration for urine-diverting toilets: System and hygiene evaluation.

When?: 24 October 2017 at 09:00
Where?: Lecture Room S, Ulls hus, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala

For further information, get in touch with Jenna Senecal at the Department of Energy and Technology, P.O. Box 7032, SE-750 07 Uppsala, Sweden. E-mail: jenna.senecal@slu.se

Abstract: Over four billion people are discharging untreated human excreta into the environment without any prior treatment, causing eutrophication and spreading disease. This eutrophication is caused by nutrients found predominantly in urine. If managed adequately, urine can be used as a fertiliser because it contains the same plant nutrients as the fertilisers used to produce the food that people eat. Currently to replace the nutrients removed from fields during harvesting, more fertilisers are being manufactured and applied and ultimately more are being leached into the environment.

The use of human urine as a fertiliser is limited by its low nutrient concentration compared with commercial fertilisers. This study sought to increase the nitrogen (N) concentration (from 0.6 % to >6 %) through dehydration to produce a dry fertiliser of monetary value and where no liquid disposal from the toilet is required. The objective of this thesis was to evaluate a treatment that could stabilise urea and concentrate the urine while retaining >80 % of the NKP. Fresh human urine was added at various intervals to wood ash or biochar to first alkalise and thus inhibit the enzyme urease which catalyses the hydrolysis of urea. The urine was then dehydrated at temperatures of between 35 and 65 °C. A hygiene assessment was undertaken to observe the inactivation of five microorganisms (three indicators: Enterococcus faecalis, MS2 bacteriophage and ΦX 174 bacteriophage; and two pathogens: Ascaris suum and Salmonella enterica sub enterica Typhimurium) at the end of the alkaline dehydration process.

Urine mass was reduced by 95 % during dehydration, while preserving up to 90 % of the N and all the P and K. Ascaris inactivation data was fitted to a non-linear regression model, which estimated that 325 days of storage would be required for a 3 log10 reduction at 20 °C and 9.2 days of storage at 42 °C. The bacteria and bacteriophages were below the detection limit within four days at 20 °C. Just collecting urine separately from faeces provides a 5.2 log10 reduction. The material is concentrated during dehydration which results in a 3.5 log10 reduction overall just from urine-diversion.

This alkaline dehydration system installed in new or already existing toilets would greatly simplify the logistics and costs of storing, transporting and applying urine as a fertiliser. The truly innovative feature is the final product, a dry powder with 7.8 % N, 2.5 % P and 10.9 % K on dry weight, i.e. equivalent to commercial fertilisers. After just four days of storage, the dehydrated medium would meet WHO and USEPA guidelines for unrestricted fertiliser use.

Posted by Prithvi Simha

Sanitation Technologies of the Future

Farewell Seminar for Håkan Jönsson!

When?: 25 October 2017 at 13:00
Where?: Room: Hörsal V, Ulls hus, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala

Online Streaming?: Click here

To honor Prof. Håkan Jönsson who retires during 2017, the Kretsloppsteknik research group at the Department of Energy and Technology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences is organizing a Farewell symposium on the 25th of October, between 13:00 and 17:30. The Symposium, entitled “Sanitation Technologies of the Future” will host several Swedish and International experts who will present their visions about the future of the sanitation sector. A schedule of the symposium can be seen below.

The symposium will be streamed online between 13:00 and 18:00 here.

Håkan Jönsson Farewell Symposium: Schedule

Posted by Prithvi Simha