Glad Påsk!

Growing up in the Netherlands, I imagined Easter to be pretty much the same all over Europe. Though Swedish Easter definitely has many aspects in common with the Dutch celebration, I was surprised by some very old traditions that I had never heard of before. When my room mates explained to me that children dress up like witches and come to the doors for candy, I was convinced they were confusing the topic with Halloween. But I was wrong! My Swedish room mate told me proudly that the Swedish Easter traditions existed long time before the American version of Halloween gained popularity in Sweden.

“Folklore alleges that witches would fly on broomsticks to a legendary meadow named Blåkulla, where they would dance with the devil.”

The tradition we are talking about is called Påskkärring (“Easter witch”), and is assumed to originate from around 1600. Folklore alleges that witches would fly on broomsticks to a legendary meadow named Blåkulla, where they would dance with the devil. A bit more exciting than Easter bunnies and eggs, don’t you agree? Based on this old story, children dress up as sweet looking witches and will make cards with drawings or rhymes which they will hand out at the doors hoping to receive Easter candy.


Amanda beautifully dressed in traditional ‘Easter-witch-clothing’
with scarf and face paint. Photo by Jeanette Axelsson.

Because of course they also eat lots of chocolate and paint chicken eggs in Sweden during Easter. The funny thing is that the chocolate eggs are different from the ones I knew: In the Netherlands we have mainly small solid chocolate eggs, individually wrapped in coloured tin foil. However, the Swedish Easter candy is presented in a beautifully decorated, very large plastic egg, which contains a lot of different chocolates and other candy inside. And while our countries share the idea of eating asparagus around Easter time, Swedes celebrates Easter with lots of fish as well.

Did you notice any other particular Swedish events this Easter? Feel free to tell all about it in the comment section below. Enjoy your Easter holidays!

Rosan

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